The Anatomy of a Follow-Up Visit

Dr. Paul Chappell

Some of the most important work in soulwinning is done after a visitor comes for the first time. Just the fact that they came indicates that their heart is open. The follow-up visit is one of the best opportunities to lead them to Christ. Here are the parts that make an effective follow-up visit.

The best follow-up visit begins when you meet the visitor at church.

Be visitor conscious at church. After spending a few minutes getting to know each other in church, having that home visit is much more comfortable. Always be on the lookout for new faces in your services to meet.

Upon arrival at the home, discern whether they are saved.

This is the most important matter to talk about. You do want them to come back to your church, but more important is that they know without a doubt that Jesus Christ is their Saviour.

Express gratitude for their visit, and share some of the background of the church.

Talk about some of the history of the church and the pastor. Share when you came to the church and how God has worked in your life through the church.

Explain some of the philosophy of the church.

Talk about how the pastor preaches from the Bible and how you sing many traditional hymns. If they come from a denominational church, explain some of what it means to be an independent Baptist church. I will often talk about how we directly support missionaries instead of going through a denomination. You may even want to go through the Baptist Distinctives.

Listen to their questions.

Ask them if they have any questions. They may want to know more about separation, children’s classes, or the Sunday service. Try to anticipate their questions and have clear answers ready.

Invite them to fellowship in your home.

During the visit, ask them to come to next Sunday’s service and then out to lunch with you afterwards. The meal doesn’t need to be extravagant, even popcorn after the evening service is fine. People appreciate the personal touch.

Introduce them to other people in the church family.

Try to find other people with similar interests. When a visitor comes, they may not even realize that Christians are real people with jobs, hobbies, and families. Help them to connect with other people like them.

Seek a commitment.

Ask them, “Can I save you a seat in class on Sunday?” Help them take that mental step from interest to commitment.

Nurture the relationship.

This takes some initiative. A follow-up visit isn’t a task we can check off our list and forget about. Consistently write notes to people who recently started coming to the church. Call them. They need someone who cares about them and their spiritual life.

Disciples are made by other disciples. When God leads someone to your church, it is a sacred stewardship of a soul, or the souls of an entire family. Commit yourself to pursuing that new person.